AccessMca

Courses

All courses are offered by the member universities and colleges of MCA, taught by real faculty, and earning real credit on a real transcript.

AccessMCA Scholars choose from a curated selection of courses each term that are ideal for high ability high school students.

Residential Summer Programs take place on college campuses, earn academic credit, and provide students with a chance to experience college life firsthand.

On-Campus Programs bring AccessMCA instructors to your school to deliver programs in person ranging from bootcamps to intensive short courses to introductory lessons.

Online Courses Designed for the First Year of University

The courses offered are the courses that students most commonly take during their first year in college. All courses have been selected to accomplish one of three things:

Satisfy standard general education requirements common to all colleges
Cover lower division prerequisites for the most common majors
Address common academic challenges that new international students often face

Students completing a year of courses successfully will enter their matched MCA university or college as a sophomore with full transfer of all courses completed.

Sample Student Course Schedules

“The following are six sample student course (subject and module) selections reflecting different student interests and objectives. Students who enter prior to Grade 12 will typically take only 1 or 2 courses per semester. Actual student schedules will be determined in consultation with advisors after students have been qualified.

Fall
Credits
Spring
Credits
ENG 100: Expository Writing
4
HIST 100: Methods of History
3
MATH 200: Linear Algebra
4
MATH 210: Multivariable Calculus
3
PHYS 151: General Physics I
3
PHYS 152: General Physics II
3
ENG 150: Intro to Engineering I
4
ENG 160: Intro to Engineering II
3
Total:
15
Total:
13
Fall
Credits
Spring
Credits
ENG 100: Expository Writing
4
HIST 100: Methods of History
3
CS 110: Programming Fundamentals
4
CS 120: Data Structures
4
MATH 191: Differential Calculus
4
MATH 192: Integral Calculus
4
ENG 150: Intro to Engineering I
4
ENG 160: Intro to Engineering II
3
Total:
16
Total:
14
Fall
Credits
Spring
Credits
ENG 100: Expository Writing
4
PSYC 100: Introduction to Psychology
4
CHEM 151: General Chemistry I
3
CHEM 152: General Chemistry II/Lab
4
BIO 151: General Biology I
3
BIO 152: General Biology II/Lab
4
MATH 191: Differential Calculus
4
HIST 100: Methods of History
3
Total:
14
Total:
15
Fall
Credits
Spring
Credits
ENG 100: Expository Writing
4
ENG 180: Survey of British Literature
4
ECON 110: Principles of Macroeconomics
4
ECON 120: Principles of Microeconomics
4
MATH 191: Differential Calculus
4
MATH 192: Integral Calculus
4
BIO 100: Topics in Biology
3
HIST 100: Methods of History
3
Total:
15
Total:
15
Fall
Credits
Spring
Credits
ENG 100: Expository Writing
4
ENG 110: Advanced Expository Writing
3
PSYC 100: Introduction to Psychology
4
PHIL 200: Knowledge and Belief
4
MATH 100: Deductive Reasoning
3
PHYS 100: Basic Concepts in Physics
3
HIST 151: US History to 1870
4
HIST 152: US History from 1870
4
Total:
15
Total:
15
Fall
Credits
Spring
Credits
ENG 100: Expository Writing
4
ENG 110: Advanced Expository Writing
4
ENG 170: Survey of American Literature
4
ENG 180: Survey of British Literature
4
BIO 100: Topics in Biology
3
MATH 100: Deductive Reasoning
3
HIST 151: US History to 1870
4
HIST 152: US History from 1870
4
Total:
15
Total:
15
AccessMCa courses

Course Offering Overview

The following courses are presently open for enrollment for Semester 2.  Semester 2 courses will run from early January to late April, with breaks for board exams, and an opportunity for students to extend enrollment by one month if additional time is needed.

Featured Courses

Science, Mathematics, Engineering

Biology

Morphology to Phylogeny - Elevate your STEM journey with a deep dive into the life sciences. Perfect for future biologists and healthcare trailblazers.

Foundations of Cybersecurity

Unlock the secrets of digital fortresses! Essential for aspiring IT professionals, cybersecurity enthusiasts, and future tech disruptors.

Programming Fundamentals I

Ignite your STEM career with a coding revolution. The foundation for data-driven pioneers and future tech innovators.

Introduction to Engineering I

Design and Statics - For aspiring engineers, this course lays the bedrock of engineering brilliance, setting the stage for innovation.

Physics

Mechanics, Kinematics, and Optics - Propel your STEM ambitions to new heights, especially if you're destined for engineering or physical sciences.

The Design of Everyday Things

Unravel the art of impactful design. A captivating exploration for design enthusiasts and future product pioneers. Learn how to design your ideal life.

Differential Calculus

A first-year college course in calculus. Essential for students who will take higher-level courses in mathematics or sciences.

Probability and Statistics

Dive into the world of data-driven decision-making and harness the power of data intelligence. Crafted for the statisticians and data analysts of tomorrow.

English, Social Sciences, Leadership

Principles of Microeconomics

Decipher the economic code of human decisions and uncover the financial intricacies that shape our world. Vital for social science enthusiasts and future economists.

Research Writing and Presentation

Master the art of impactful research, persuasive arguments, and captivating presentations. Highly recommended for all students.

Topics in Political Science (MUN)

Delve into international relations with this core political science course, tailored for Model United Nations (MUN) champions or those wishing to become MUN champions.

Fundamental of Leadership / Resilience

Gain insights from industry leaders and discover the science behind resilience. Earn a certificate as a peer resilience facilitator and advance toward Global Leadership mastery.

Business, Commerce

Principles of Insurance and Risk Management

Pave the way for a career in finance, banking, or insurance with this gateway course. Fast track to an integrated MBA program.

Business Fundamentals

Equip yourself with the essential knowledge for a successful business career or entrepreneurial venture.

Featured Courses

CS 110: Programming Fundamentals I
An introduction to computing as a problem-solving discipline. Emphasis is on programming as a methodology for problem solving, including: the precise specification of a problem, the design of its solution, the encoding of that solution, and the testing, debugging and maintenance of programs. (3 credits)
CS 1010: Foundations of Cybersecurity
This course provides fundamental skills and understanding of the knowledge areas, topics, and tools of the cybersecurity discipline. Students will learn the essentials of cybersecurity to include information security policies and countermeasures; network protocols and services; Linux operating system; security features in Windows; network attacks; protecting the network; endpoint security and analysis; cryptography and the public key infrastructure; security monitoring; intrusion data analysis; incident response and handling; and introduction to programming using Python. (3 credits).
Product Design 125: The Design of Everyday Things
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the four phases of the design process. Students should demonstrate a basic understanding of problem solving, user needs, and if applicable the elements of diversity, equity, and inclusive design. (3 credits)
ENGR 150: Introduction to Engineering I: Design and Statics
This course introduces students to the basic principles of engineering and the various disciplines that constitute the field. Major engineering accomplishments are studied from historical, political, artistic and economic viewpoints. Students work in teams to solve engineering design problems and undertake laboratory investigations. Foundations of engineering science including force equilibrium, concepts of stress and strain, Ohm’s Law, and Kirchhoff ’s Voltage and Current Laws are studied. Credits Awarded: 4.
BIO 151: General Biology I
This course includes an overview of ecology emphasizing the ways organisms interact with their physical and biological environment, and the study of animal and plant diversity, anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on structure function relationships and homeostasis. Credits Awarded: 3.

Biology

BIO 100: Current Topics in Biology
The fundamental nature of biology as a science which is of special concern and importance to an intellectually well-rounded college graduate facing the challenges of understanding the constantly changing complexities of the living world around us. This course will provide the non-specialist with the information required for making intelligent choices about issues that are scientific, social, political, and economic in nature. Credits Awarded: 3.
BIO 151: General Biology I
This course includes an overview of ecology emphasizing the ways organisms interact with their physical and biological environment, and the study of animal and plant diversity, anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on structure function relationships and homeostasis. Credits Awarded: 3.
BIO 152: General Biology II
This course includes the study of cell biology, including cellular structure and function, metabolism, enzyme activity, and energetics, Mendelian and molecular genetics, including discussion and use of modern techniques as a means to answer biological questions, and evolutionary biology, including the relationships between the major taxa, and how the interaction of organisms with their environment drives the evolutionary process. Credits Awarded: 3.
BIO 199: Neuroscience of Resilience
Building on two decades of research at the Mayo Clinic, this course explores neural traps and shows how transcending those traps can undo many of our brain’s vulnerabilities. Taking a neuroscience perspective, and grounded in empirical research, this course will explore topics such as the resilient mindset, gratitude, mindful presence, as well as the connections between resilience, behavior, and immune response. Students completing the course will have the option of completing the requirements for becoming a Certified Resilience Training (CeRT). Credits Awarded: 4.

Business

BUS 121: Fundamentals of Investing
Topics include: the basic accounting principles used in different valuation techniques for valuing a public or private company; the relevant business principles used to evaluate comparative advantages of organic vs. merger and acquisition approach to growth; how to evaluate potential acquisition companies in terms of markets, customers, vendors, and potential efficiencies; how to determine the value of a company, using methods such as discounted cash flow, comparable sales, and net tangible assets minus liabilities.
BUS 140: Business Fundamentals
General survey course that introduces the students to the various business disciplines. Students will briefly investigate the disciplines of accounting, finance, international business, law, management and marketing and how all of these disciplines are interrelated. The areas of business ethics and social responsibility will also be examined.
BUS 150: Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
Provides hands-on learning on how to launch a startup organization through the rapid development and testing of ideas by gathering customer and marketplace feedback. tudents learn how to reduce both uncertainty and risk by engaging actual customers in search of their pain points and unmet needs. Only by doing so can the entrepreneur develop a proper solution and establish a suitable business model. The class utilizes a lean startup approach that provides the steps needed to build a successful startup.

Chemistry

CHEM 100: Introduction to Chemistry
This course presents selected chemical concepts at an introductory level for students who are not majoring in one of the sciences. Topics include atomic, ionic and molecular properties, bonding, balanced equations, acids and bases, solutions, simple organic structures, polymers, and nuclear chemistry. Credits Awarded: 3.
CHEM 151: General Chemistry I
This is the first course in a two-semester sequence of introductory chemistry that is for all students who wish to major in science and who do not have a thorough high-school preparation in chemistry. Topics include stoichiometry, states of matter, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, and geometry of molecules. Credits Awarded: 3.
CHEM 152: General Chemistry II
The second in a two-semester sequence of introductory chemistry that is for all students who wish to major in science and who do not have a thorough high-school preparation in chemistry. Topics include chemical energy, equilibria, kinetics, acids and bases, and chemical reaction types. Credits Awarded: 3.

Communications

COMM 140: Public Speaking
Students examine principles of oral and visual rhetoric in this course, with an emphasis on guided practice in the development of effective presentation. The course leads students to gain proficiency in the art of rhetoric.

Computer Science

CS 110: Programming Fundamentals I
An introduction to computing as a problem-solving discipline. Emphasis is on programming as a methodology for problem solving, including: the precise specification of a problem, the design of its solution, the encoding of that solution, and the testing, debugging and maintenance of programs. (3 credits)
CS 120: Programming Fundamentals II
A continuation of CS 110 using object oriented programming classes to introduce and implement the elementary data structures including lists, stacks, queues and trees. Advanced programming techniques such as indirection, inheritance, and templates are introduced, along with an emphasis on algorithm analysis, efficiency, and good programming style.

Economics

ECON 110: Principles of Macroeconomics
An introduction to economic principles and concepts, designed to prepare students for additional work in economics, business, and accounting. The course deals with such topics as supply and demand, markets, money, the determination of national income, employment and the price level, and international trade. The government's role in the economy is examined throughout. Satisfies college social science requirement. Credits Awarded: 4.
ECON 221: Principles of Microeconomics
An introduction to economic analysis at the microeconomic level which focuses on individual and firm decision-making in a market environment. This course deals with such topics as consumer demand, costs of production and supply, resource allocation, the role of competition in markets, labor and resource markets and the economics of the environment. Credits Awarded: 3.

Engineering

ENGR 150: Introduction to Engineering I: Design and Statics
This course introduces students to the basic principles of engineering and the various disciplines that constitute the field. Major engineering accomplishments are studied from historical, political, artistic and economic viewpoints. Students work in teams to solve engineering design problems and undertake laboratory investigations. Foundations of engineering science including force equilibrium, concepts of stress and strain, Ohm’s Law, and Kirchhoff ’s Voltage and Current Laws are studied. Credits Awarded: 4.
ENGR 160: Introduction to Engineering II: Materials/Materials Science.
Introduction to the science and engineering of materials with an emphasis on application to engineering design. Topics will include structure processing-property relationships in materials, atomic bonding, crystal structure, phase diagrams, control of deformation in metals, a survey of common engineering materials and their properties, and materials selection for engineering design. Credits Awarded: 3.

English

ENG 100: Expository Writing and Rhetoric
A course designed to hone students ability to write clearly while providing clear explanations or making sustained arguments. Introduces students to the norms and conventions of standard written English in the college and university context. Also includes elements of effective oral communication and presentation of student work. Credits Awarded: 4.
ENG 110: Advanced Rhetoric: Research and Persuasive Writing
A course in which students write academic essays in which they practice rhetorical strategies, research-based argumentation, and methods of composing effective prose. In the process of writing these essays, students develop critical thinking and reading skills with emphasis on analytical, persuasive and research writing. Credits Awarded: 4.
ENG 150: Great Books in the Western Tradition.
Great Books of the Western World from Antiquity to the Middle Ages. Selections may include the Bible and works by authors such as Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, Vergil, Ovid, Augustine, and Dante. The writing content includes a variety of writing exercises that incorporate traditional compositional and rhetorical skills. Credits Awarded: 4.
ENG 170: Survey of American Literature.
A historical and cultural study of American literature from the colonial period through the Civil War. Focuses on major works and authors such as Wheatley, Franklin, Irving, Douglass, Poe, Thoreau, Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman, Dickinson, Stowe, and major genres, forms, and literary periods such as autobiography, poetry, short stories, the Enlightenment, Transcendentalism, Sentimentalism. Credits Awarded: 4.
ENG 180: Survey of British Literature
A historical and cultural study of British literature from its beginning to the end of the 18th century. Focuses on major works and authors (e.g., Beowulf, Chaucer, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, Milton, Behn, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Austen) and major genres, forms, and literary movements (e.g., epic, romance, sonnet, devotional poetry, drama, prose, fiction, satire). Credits Awarded: 4.

Environmental Science and Sustainability

BIO 160: Ecological and Evolutionary Systems
Students examine basic concepts in ecology and evolutionary biology to gain insights into adaptive features. Topics include: population genetics and ecology, evolutionary development and speciation, phylogenetics and genomics, adaptive biology, ecosystem dynamics, and biodiversity. Students develop critical thinking skills by applying those concepts to solve biological problems and learn scientific communication skills. Credits Awarded: 4.

History

HIST 100: Survey of US History
A survey of American history from the earliest moments through the modern period focusing on the ideas and ideals that have motivated and animated the American experiment. By focusing on sources of conflict and common ground, the course allows students to delve into timeless and eternal questions regarding democracy, citizenship, essential freedoms, and the rule of law. Credits Awarded 3.
HIST 151: US History to 1870
This survey course examines the rise of the American nation from its colonial origins through the Civil War and Reconstruction. The approach is thematic and special emphasis is placed upon the impact of European contact with Native Americans, the establishment and abolition of slavery, the struggle for women’s equality, the influence of industrialization, westward movement, the evolution of republican institutions, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and the nation’s gradual rise to prominence. Credits Awarded: 4.
HIST 152: US History from 1870
This course surveys U.S. history from Reconstruction to the present. It examines the major social, cultural, political, and economic events that shaped the U.S. after the Civil War, focusing especially on industrialization, Progressivism, WW I, the Great Depression, the New Deal, WW II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Sixties and the Reagan administration. Credits Awarded: 4.

Mathematics

MATH 100: Deductive Reasoning and Quantitative Information
A quantitative reasoning course that teaches how to use algebraic tools and real world data to make informed decisions and avoid being misled in public policy, science, health, and business. Topics include logic; interpreting graphs and tables; functions such as linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic with applications to population growth and personal finance; and fundamentals of probability and statistics such as false positives and statistical significance. Also included are elementary rules of logic and deduction. Satisfies the mathematics requirement, for non majors. Credits Awarded: 3.
MATH 191: Differential Calculus
Introduces students to techniques of limits and derivatives and other tools used in the formal study of rates of change of functions. Credits Awarded: 4.
MATH 192: Integral Calculus
Techniques of integration, differential equations, sequences and series, polar coordinators, and applications. Credits Awarded: 4.
MATH 200: Linear Algebra
The study of Linear Algebra and ordinary differential equations. Credits Awarded: 4.
MATH 210: Multivariable Calculus
The study of systems of differential equations and multivariable calculus including differentiation, multiple integration, and calculus on vector fields. Credits Awarded: 4.

Philosophy

PHIL 100: Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to philosophy through a consideration of such topics as the person, human values, freedom, morality, knowledge, depth, the meaning of life, God, and the nature and destiny of human existence. Students come to understand that philosophy asks the most fundamental questions about ourselves, the world, and the relationship between the two. The method of philosophical thinking and critical reflection will be stressed. Credits Awarded: 3.
PHIL 200: Knowledge and Belief
"All men by nature desire to know," says Aristotle in his Metaphysics. This famous quote raises numerous questions. What is knowledge? Why do we want it? How do we know when we have it? This course will examine these and related questions, such as "Can we be certain of anything?" "What are the sources of knowledge?" "Is scientific knowledge easier to attain than moral or religious knowledge?" Credits Awarded: 4.
PHIL 201: Introduction to Logic
The study of the structure of reasoning. This course will introduce students to techniques for recognizing, formalizing, and evaluating the logical structures of arguments. Students will be taught symbolic languages, how to translate English arguments into those languages, and proof and testing procedures using the languages. This course will, along with introducing students to the rudiments of logic, explain how logic is employed in the articulation and solution of problems in various subdisciplines of philosophy. Credits Awarded: 4.

Physics

PHYS 100: Basic Concepts of Physics
The basic ideas of physics in a historical and philosophical framework to give the students insight and appreciation of physics of this century and how physics relates to our contemporary society. Not intended for science majors. Credits Awarded: 3.
PHYS 151: General Physics I
The course is calculus-based and designed for students desiring professional science careers. It provides a rigorous examination of the following physical phenomena and systems: forces, conservation of momentum, energy (kinetic, potential, chemical, and thermal), fields, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics. Credits Awarded: 3.
PHYS 152: General Physics II
A continuation of Phys 151. The course provides a rigorous introduction to the following topics: 1) electricity and magnetism, 2) geometric optics, 3) physical optics and waves, 4) atomic and nuclear physics. Credits Awarded: 3.

Psychology

PSYC 100: Introduction to Psychology
An introduction to the science of behavior and mental life, ranging from biological foundations to social and cultural influences on behavior (introducing most of the content areas covered in other psychology courses). Research labs offer experimental and correlational hands-on experience that comprises the fourth credit. Credits Awarded: 3. A lab option can be taken for a fourth credit.

Sociology

SOC 100: Sociology and Social Problems
An examination of the concepts and theories which make up the sociological perspective, the evidence which tests these theories, and the ways in which the sociological perspective can aid in understanding social phenomena in the contemporary world. Credits Awarded: 4.
AccessMCa courses

Summer Programs

Joint University of Detroit Mercy, Madonna University, Northwood University, and College for Creative Studies
Mobility Summer Program

Dates:

June 16 - July 3, 2024

Credits:

2
Spring Arbor University
Research, Writing, and Presentation

Dates:

May 6 – May 17, 2024 (online portion April 22 – May 3, 2024)

Credits:

4
Andrews University
Introduction to Engineering

Dates:

July 1 – July 15, 2024

Credits:

2
Aquinas College
Business Fundamentals

Dates:

June 3 – June 21, 2024

Credits:

3
Alma College
Model United Nations Bootcamp

Dates:

May 6 – May 17, 2024

Credits:

2
AccessMCa courses

On-Campus Programs

Coming Soon...
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